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Jack Adams
Jack Adams

Microsoft MapPoint 2006


New versions have not always been at the same time as the equivalent Office releases despite being numbered similarly; notably the 2002 release was excluded from the Office XP suites due to a lack of equivalent programmability, and 2006 was released well before Office 2007. The program's icon and toolbars were not updated until the 2009 release to stay consistent with modern software applications.




Microsoft MapPoint 2006



Old versions 2004 and 2006 both included 336 pushpin symbols. The 2009 version replaced these symbols with a new set of 46 pushpins. This resulted in users trying to restore the pushpins from version 2006 and earlier. The full range of pushpins were reintroduced in MapPoint 2010 with updated visual styling.[15]


MapPoint 2006 can be acquired through Microsoft resellers and Microsoft licensing programs and at for an estimated retail price of $299 for the standard version, and $349 for the version with a GPS locator.


I have Microsoft MapPoint 2006 installed as a part of a larger system for home/social care planning. The maps and the address information points are quite incomplete and I would like to roll out my own layers that are way better.


The most significant new feature of MapPoint 2006 is the addition of GPS-based driving and guidance. One version of the app comes bundled with Microsoft's latest GPS locator. If you install MapPoint 2006 on your laptop, not only can you geographically analyze your data, you can use it to provide voice-prompted turn-by-turn driving directions using an interface that appears to be identical to that of Microsoft Streets & Trips 2006. MapPoint 2006 has all of the features of Streets &Trips 2006, but adds menu options for importing and mapping data.


Using the included 2004 demographic data supplied by AGS (Applied Geographic Solutions), MapPoint 2006 makes it simple to visualize a number of variables such as household size, population, marriage/divorce statistics, and household income. For example, you can generate a map showing average household income by state in seconds. Consumer behavior data, collected in 2003, is supplied by Simmons Market Research and allows you to overlay map data based on an extensive list of variables. Among the variables included are vehicle ownership, vehicle most likely to purchase, book/CD purchases, vacation and frequent-flyer program participation, and PC usage (including connection type, personal banking, and online shopping). Both demographic and consumer data can be mapped by state, county, metropolitan statistical area, ZIP code, and census tract.


The integration of MapPoint 2006 with driving and guidance makes it really simple to plan a business trip. Based on a sample set of data in which clients were assigned a priority, I could see on the map in less than a minute that a number of high-priority clients were near Atlanta. To plan the simulated business trip, I set the Atlanta airport as the starting and ending point. By dragging a selection box around the pushpin locations of my high-priority clients, I added them as intermediate stops. One click later, I had a complete itinerary. With the addition of a GPS receiver, MapPoint could provide voice-prompted turn-by-turn guidance, just like Microsoft Streets and Trips 2006.


Often when you generate visual data you want to share it with others. For people who don't have MapPoint installed, you can output maps by saving them as a Web page. You can also easily copy maps into Microsoft Word, PowerPoint, or Publisher. MapPoint 2006 also integrates into Office 2000 and later programs by placing MapPoint buttons and menu commands on office toolbars.


The list price of $299 may seem steep, but the included demographic and consumer behavior database is probably worth that alone. Add in the ability to visualize data geographically and all of the features of Streets and Trips 2006, and MapPoint


New versions have not always been at the same time as the equivalent Office releases despite being numbered similarly; notably the 2002 release was excluded from the Office XP suites due to a lack of equivalent programmability, and 2006 was released well before Office 2007. The program's icon and toolbars have also not been updated since the 2002 release to stay consistent with modern software applications.


Version 2009[1] sporting an overhauled interface and claimed better Office integration is planned was released in late 2008.[2] The core map rendering engine remained the same and the GIS data wasn't updated as recently as one might expect of a product released in 2008, leaving out subdivisions, roads and other features that were completed in 2007 and which are shown on online mapping systems.[3] Additionally, the 2009 version eliminated all built in icons with icons that were primarily brown or darker colors. This made them difficult to see on the map and resulted in users trying to restore the icon sets from version 2006.[4]


Old versions 2004 and 2006 both included 336 pushpin symbols. The new version 2009 replaced these symbols with a new set of 46 pushpins. A new template[5] can be used to add missing pushpin images to the program.


mappoint.exe is a process belonging to Microsoft MapPoint Application from Microsoft Corporation.Non-system processes like mappoint.exe originate from software you installed on your system. Since most applications store data on your hard disk and in your system's registry, it is likely that your computer has suffered fragmentation and accumulated invalid entries which can affect your PC's performance. In Windows Task Manager, you can see what CPU, memory, disk and network utilization is causing the Microsoft MapPoint 2006 process. To access the Task Manager, hold down the Ctrl + Shift + Esc keys at the same time. These three buttons are located on the far left of your keyboard.


The mappoint.exe is an executable file on your computer's hard drive. This file contains machine code. If you start the software Microsoft MapPoint Application on your PC, the commands contained in mappoint.exe will be executed on your PC. For this purpose, the file is loaded into the main memory (RAM) and runs there as a Microsoft MapPoint 2006 process (also called a task).if(typeof ez_ad_units != 'undefined')ez_ad_units.push([[580,400],'processlibrary_com-medrectangle-3','ezslot_11',108,'0','0']);__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-processlibrary_com-medrectangle-3-0');


Many non-system processes that are running can be stopped because they are not involved in running your operating system.mappoint.exe is used by 'Microsoft MapPoint Application'. This is an application created by 'Microsoft Corporation'.If you no longer use Microsoft MapPoint Application, you can permanently remove this software and thus mappoint.exe from your PC. To do this, press the Windows key + R at the same time and then type 'appwiz.cpl'. Then find Microsoft MapPoint Application in the list of installed programs and uninstall this application.if(typeof ez_ad_units != 'undefined')ez_ad_units.push([[580,400],'processlibrary_com-medrectangle-4','ezslot_12',114,'0','0']);__ez_fad_position('div-gpt-ad-processlibrary_com-medrectangle-4-0');


Most mappoint issues are caused by the application executing the process. The surest way to fix these errors is to update or uninstall this application. Therefore, please search the Microsoft Corporation website for the latest Microsoft MapPoint Application update.


Microsoft releases MapPoint 2006:Microsoft Corp. today announced the availability of MapPoint® 2006, an industry leader in business mapping software. MapPoint 2006 can help customers improve decision-making capabilities and increase new business


Microsoft MapPoint 2004, 2006, 2009, or 2010* is required. OMD recommends using a 17-inch monitor. When the map feature is accessed in Dispatch Central (TM), the map will fill the screen of a 17-inch monitor if the screen resolution is set to 800 by 600 pixels.


Microsoft MapPoint as the software is typically updated yearly and available in both upgrade and full packaged product form, the current version being 2006, which significantly updated GPS integration and features. Previous versions were released starting with 2000 (developing from Expedia Streets, a consumer mapping application included with Office 97 Small Business Edition), which was slated to be included in the Office 2000 Premium Edition suite, but never was.


Subsequent releases followed in 2001 (very similar to 2000, and more of a data update), 2002, and 2004. New versions have not always been at the same time as the equivalent Office releases despite being numbered similarly; notably the 2002 release was excluded from the Office XP suites due to a lack of equivalent programmability, and 2006 was released well before Office 2007. The program's icon and toolbars have also not been updated since the 2002 release to stay consistent with the current Office suites.


Las versiones nuevas no siempre estuvieron disponibles al mismo tiempo que las nuevas versiones de Office; notablemente la 2002 fue excluida de la suite Office XP debido a una falla durante su programación que dio como resultado dicho retraso. Otro ejemplo lo constituye la versión 2006, que fue lanzada al mercado antes que Office 2007.


Many of OSM's volunteer mappers see themselves as part of a worldwide "open geo-data" movement. Maps have traditionally been restricted by copyright and are often expensive to acquire. OSM, however, was conceived as "Wikipedia meets maps", aiming "to map the world and give the data away for free". The "Wikification" of mapping appeals to 30-year-old, London-based web developer Harry Wood, who's been mapping for OSM since 2006. "To me, it's about releasing the data, making sure the underlying data is free," he says. "So many exciting technological things can happen when geo-data is released." He was one of "about 300" volunteer OSM "armchair mappers" who mobilised in the hours after the earthquake and set about mapping the disaster zone, street by street.


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